Reddish Vale Golf Club
Cheshire, England, United Kingdom

Reddish Vale is an unheralded design gem, especially for a course built by Alister MacKenzie and that features some of the most memorable holes in the game. In the foreground is the sixth green reached from 240 yards away from a tee high on the hill. The fairway that leads up to the clubhouse is the eighteenth whose steep grade is unmatched in golf.

Reddish Vale is an unheralded design gem, especially for a course built by Alister MacKenzie and that features some of the most memorable holes in the game. In the foreground is the sixth green reached from 240 yards away from a tee high on the hill. The fairway that leads up to the clubhouse is the eighteenth whose steep grade is unmatched in golf.

How artists begin their careers is as varied as the works they produce. Some like Mozart and Orson Wells commence with a bang and never look back while others including Monet and Raymond Chandler dabble here and there before finding their voice. After a round at Reddish Vale, Alister MacKenzie’s third eighteen hole course, one might conclude that MacKenzie belongs in the latter group. That would be inaccurate – he started with a bang!

MacKenzie’s first efforts were Alwoodley and Moortown, both located near Leeds 50 miles away. Admired far and wide, these courses possess the design attributes of a man who became a legend: great routings, strategy, well-integrated hazards, and imaginative green complexes. Alwoodley has especially stood the test of time and enjoys the same sense of expansiveness today that it did in MacKenzie’s time. Nobody mentions today’s Reddish Vale in the same breath with either Alwoodley or Moortown. And yet, to the author’s eye, it might well have been their peer.

When it opened in 1913 Reddish Vale possessed drama of the highest order. No other inland course in the United Kingdom offered such adventure, save for The Addington outside of London and perhaps Sunningdale Old. Listen to how Reddish Vale played then: its first five holes were high on the bluff where the clubhouse sits. Ravines and gullies abounded and threatened approach shots on this opening stretch. Ten mile long views were afforded over the English countryside, whose rolling landforms are always appropriately termed ‘lovely.’  To the left of the fourth and fifth fairways was a precipitous 150 foot drop with the rushing River Tame below. Unobstructed, the wind whipped around on these upland holes. Then, the mighty 240 yard sixth plunged downhill to a green beside the river. Holes seven and eight followed the river and led the golfer to the cunning ninth, which played steeply uphill to a modified Redan green.

Standing on the edge of a vale at the tenth tee, the golfer with his hickory clubs most assuredly appreciated the wondrous front nine journey he had just taken. He encountered burly two shotters that require shots over deep depressions to large rolling greens. Also, a quartet of superb one shotters, one of golf’s best in its time:  the second over a gully to a green with a wicked back to front tilt, the dramatic fourth that runs along the precipice, the drop shot monster sixth, and a Redan which yard-for-yard is as tough as an English bulldog.

What did the back nine hold? More superlative golf with another string of holes rife with character that perhaps even outshines the front nine! Until at least WWII Reddish Vale was an eye-opening pleasure to the senses, a delight to play, and a challenge for the very best. No golfer could ask for more. That MacKenzie went on to become the game’s greatest architect should surprise no one – that’s how good his work was here.

The river is a feature rarely found in English golf and it brings a real sparkle to the proceedings. Its presence was once felt far greater throughout the course. The unblocked view from the sixteenth tee shows its true majesty.

The river is a feature rarely found in English golf and it brings a real sparkle to the proceedings at Reddish Vale. Its presence was once felt throughout the course to a far greater extent than it is today. The unblocked view from the sixteenth tee shows its true majesty and enduring appeal.

Rather than continue this fanciful stroll down memory lane, let’s examine today’s course. The most important thing is that all the holes noted above still exist! Yet, there are two primary reasons why it is no longer celebrated in the manner it deserves and once enjoyed.

First, there is the yardage. Unlike Alwoodley, the course is hemmed in by natural features that include a winding river and steep embankments. Its par is 69 and there isn’t room to extend its current 6,100 yards. It surely provided a cracking test for hickory players in 1915 who drove it 230 yards, but today one might sniff that it plays too short – and that would be wrong as we will see in the Holes to Note section below. Indeed, with its compact 120 acres of land, ravines, flowing water, and deft mix of long and short holes, the course reminds the author of Merion from her white tees of 6,105 yards (Merion’s back nine measures 2,865 yards by the way). In both cases, the golfer is left to wonder how so many quality shots could be fit into such modest dimensions.

Secondly, unchecked growth on the steep embankments and along the riverbanks has occurred for sake of stability. Unfortunately, the unintended consequence is that the dominant natural features are obscured, the very features upon which MacKenzie so carefully based the course. Today’s golfer plays the fourth and fifth holes devoid of the glorious, edge of the world vistas that once unfolded to his left. Today, spindly weed trees make the fifth a pedestrian hole, which is not how MacKenzie left it. Allow the golfer to sense the drama of playing high beside an embankment, discern that death awaits a pulled tee shot, let the winds sweep through, firm the turf and voilà, the fifth would play with the pizazz that MacKenzie intended. Down in the vale the river’s presence is sorely missed at the sixth through eighth and fifteenth holes. They remain fine holes but that extra spark and dimension that separates MacKenzie’s work from others is absent.

On the positive side, fine work has been done to improve two of MacKenzie’s holes, the fourteenth and sixteenth as we will see below. Additionally, the former Assistant Greenkeeper  Nick Wilde was promoted to Head Greenkeeper in the fall of 2012. His work over the past eight months gives great hope that Reddish Vale’s glory days are on the return.

Holes To Note

(Please note: all photographs found within this course profile are courtesy of Mark Rowlinson, Duncan Cheslett, and Jim Eder).

First hole, 420 yards; The least interesting shot on the entire course occurs on the first tee. That puts Reddish Vale in good company with Scotland’s Turnberry and Sebonack on Long Island. Housing is visible and the fairway appears flat and devoid of interest. However, a two hundred yard walk ahead unveils something entirely different. The game is on!

As seen from behind, the downhill approach shot to the first is a thriller and must clear a 100 yard wide ravine.

As seen from behind, the downhill approach shot to the first is a thriller and must clear a 100 yard wide ravine.

Fourth hole, 170 yards; This was Henry Cotton’s favorite one shotter of the five and as he noted, a finer set ‘… could hardly be imagined.’  Reddish Vale originally opened with six one shot holes. Three of them are played in the first six holes, a sure sign that MacKenzie was a ‘lay of the land’ architect and believed in finding the best holes no matter how unconventional their sequencing might be. The back to back par 5s and par 3s at Cypress Point are another such example of following nature’s lead.

The 32 yard long fourth green is a mere twelve paces wide in front before widening at the rear. Yet, back hole locations require one or perhaps two more clubs and are no bargain. Out of bounds is just to the left. Sadly, sweeping long vistas are precluded by the jungle on the left.

The 32 yard long fourth green is a mere ten paces wide in front before widening at the rear. Yet, back hole locations require one or perhaps two more clubs and are no bargain. Out of bounds is just to the left. Sadly, sweeping long vistas are precluded by the jungle on the left.

Sixth hole, 240 yards; Devotees of English golf will think of Nott’s famous downhill thirteenth whose heath and gorse clad hillsides paint a picture of exquisite charm. When created this hole matched-up because of the sight of the flowing river. Unfortunately, that grand panoramic view is now obscured. Hopefully, the inspired tree and brush clearing begun the past year will continue until the grandeur of the forty foot wide Tame is fully revealed. It’s too unique an asset to keep hidden. The Tree Preservation Order (TPO) is in place on certain of the older specimen trees along the river and that’s fine: we all enjoy stately, specimen trees. However, there is no excuse for keeping the spindly silver birches and bushy weeds.

Sean Arble prepares to flight his tee ball with a five wood. What a shame that he can’t view the bending River Tame behind and to the left of the green because of the dense vegetation.

The golfer prepares to flight his tee ball with a two hybrid. What a great shame that he can’t view the bending River Tame behind and to the left of the green because of the dense vegetation.

Eighth hole, 395 yards; The dirty secret of Reddish Vale is that the first nine measures less than 2,800 yards. How can that be, you scream; I have been hitting utility clubs and even a wood into some of the greens?! The answer lies in the fact that the first nine has four one shot holes. If two of them were par fours, the side would easily measure another 400 plus yards. Additionally, a hole like the eighth features a drive and approach that both stair step uphill, making the hole play at least twenty yards longer than the scorecard indicates.

 As seen from behind, both the tee ball and approach play uphill over broken ground.

As seen from behind, both the tee ball and approach play uphill over broken ground.

Ninth hole, 135 yards; Pugnacious, this little brute can be a card wrecker and the side isn’t successful until the golfer gets past it unscathed. Out of bounds long and a false front create a tension in which only the most exact shot will find and hold the minuscule 2,300 square foot putting surface. Built into the corner of the property, this hole is a prime example of an architect getting the most out of every inch on a site.

Mongrel holes could have easily emerged from this portion of the property in the hands of a lesser architect. Instead, MacKenzie built this beauty which also made the tenth possible.

Mongrel holes could have easily emerged from this portion of the property in the hands of a lesser architect. Instead, MacKenzie built this beauty which also made the tenth possible.

Standing on the tenth tee, the golfer looks across the hard to find ninth green and appreciates the seclusion afforded him by being down in the vale.

Standing on the tenth tee, the golfer looks across the hard to find ninth green and appreciates the seclusion afforded him by being down in the vale.

 

continued>