Art and Architecture

Paintings by Frank Giordano

When Frank Giordano decided to go to a college prep school at age 13, he started caddying at the Brooklawn Country Club near his home in Bridgeport, Connecticut, to earn his tuition money.  A baseball player at the time, Frank soon learned that the grace and power, the elegance and explosiveness he admired in Joe DiMaggio and Willie Mays were also evident in the gifted golfer.  During a short game clinic he gave to the members at Brooklawn, Julius Boros demonstrated a delicacy of touch in the powerful exercise of his massive hands and forearms.  The naturalness of such poetry in motion, and the unassuming manner by which Julius exhibited such talent, made a lasting impression.

Over the next 55 years, Frank played courses across the United States, the Caribbean islands, and the British Isles.  It was when his own children were ready for prep schools that Frank, whose day job was as a Professor of English Literature at the University of Houston, began publishing stories about golf as a free-lance writer.

“Over my 30 years writing career, I wrote regularly about golf courses and resorts for the Golf Traveler magazine, Private Clubs magazine, and Diversion, as well as for in-flight and city and lifestyle magazines.  I also served as ghost writer for a long series (over 2 years) of Hank Haney’s articles, for a year-long series by LPGA professional Betsy Cullen, and for several other teaching professionals.  My work appeared in Golf, Golf Tips, LINKS, and Golf Illustrated as well.  For the prestigious River Oaks Country Club in Houston, I wrote their history in the early 1990s. As a life member of the Golf Writers Association of America, I interviewed many of the leading tour professionals and golf instructors in Texas while I lived there, and worked often with golf course architects like Robert von Hagge, Bruce Devlin, and Joe Finger.”

His most recent pieces have appeared in the Pilot newspaper in Southern Pines, North Carolina.  Frank is currently preparing articles on the North & South golf tournament held at Pinehurst Country Club and an article on golf in Myrtle Beach for a Chinese golf and travel magazine. He has also published two books and tens of articles on wine and art.

His paintings of golf courses are exhibited and sold online and in several galleries in the Sandhills area of North Carolina. Frank may be contacted directly via email at warcinc@nc.rr.com.

Pebble Beach #17

The painting depicts the illustrious and historical 17th hole at America’s iconic golf course, Pebble Beach. Set on the breathtakingly beautiful Monterey peninsula, Pebble Beach is one of the world’s finest as well as most stunningly scenic golf courses. Site of several important golf championships for nearly 100 years, Pebble Beach is probably on more golfers’ “bucket lists” than any other accessible course in the country. Who can forget Tom Watson’s chipping in for a birdie here to secure his US Open victory over Jack Nicklaus in 1982?

Tralee #16

Players find another magnificent setting at Tralee’s #16, a 200 yd par 3 that traverses another chasm down to its green at the ocean’s edge. Depending on the wind’s direction and intensity, the forced carry at #16, at its greatest difficulty, could well require a driver from the tee from ordinary mortals. The over-sized 20×60″ acrylic painting represents the hole’s majesty as a sporting challenge and its extraordinary brilliance as a physical setting. Those who can’t leave 16 without taking a look back down the fairway will encounter another breathtaking view of the Emerald Isle’s glorious enchantments.

Pebble

Tralee #12

This stirring 440 yd par 4 hole, with a narrow driving area and an 80 foot chasm in front of the left side of the green, suggests a veritable golfing Hell, were it not such a helluva hole. The severe right-to-left slope right of the green can cause the despairing player to wonder where to place the approach. However, the green is open in front to accept running shots along the ground. Like the old American Express ad advised, don’t leave home without your bump-and-run shot. The 12×48″ acrylic painting gives a panoramic view of the hole and others nearby. The mountains in the background and the ever-changing Irish skies endow this very challenging hole with a truly epic dimension. It’s only part kiddingly that locals say Arnold designed the front 9, but God created the back.

Whistling Straits #7

It looks like it was used for bombardment practice, with ships lobbing explosives from Lake Michigan into the dunes land along the shore. Or it could have been a shower of meteors that fell from the stratosphere and left the shoreline pocked with sandy depressions. Actually, it was Pete Dye’s overheated imagination, in a frenzy of creative ecstasy, that inspired him to produce a work of such extravagance that only the adjective Rococo can begin to describe.

Whistling Straits is not a freak, though, as several major American championships, for both men and women, have been conducted there.

Barnbougle Dunes, #7, Doak Course

This original panoramic acrylic painting, 12×36″ on plywood, depicts a golf hole at the Doak course at the Barnbougle Dunes resort in Tasmania, the Australian Island in the North East. Designed by Tom Doak and some of his associates, the course is open for public play. It has been called the finest modern course by one very knowledgeable writer. The island Tasmania, described as a little bit of golfing paradise, is an ideal location for links golf, with large sand dunes, firm turf, ever-present winds, and plenty of sunshine year-round. This is a “must stop” on the journey of every peripatetic pilgrim with a special veneration for the game.

NGLA: A view from the tee at #17 on the National Golf Links of America. The doyen of British golf writers, Bernard Darwin, early in the last century considered this the finest view in the entire world of golf. Painting based on photo supplied by Jon Cavalier.

NGLA: A view from the tee at #17 on the National Golf Links of America. The doyen of British golf writers, Bernard Darwin, early in the last century considered this the finest view in the entire world of golf. Painting based on photo supplied by Jon Cavalier.

Pacific Dunes, #11, a splendid par 3 on Tom Doak's masterpiece at Bandon Dunes in Oregon. Painting based on Jon Cavalier's photo.

Pacific Dunes, #11, a splendid par 3 on Tom Doak’s masterpiece at Bandon Dunes in Oregon. Painting based on Jon Cavalier’s photo.

Kingston Heath, considered the second finest course in Australia, winds its way through the heathland a few miles north of Melbourne. This view of the 10th hole illustrates well the bunkering artistry of Alister Mackenzie. Painting based on Benjamin Litman's photo.

Kingston Heath, considered the second finest course in Australia, winds its way through the heathland a few miles north of Melbourne. This view of the 10th hole illustrates well the bunkering artistry of Alister Mackenzie. Painting based on Benjamin Litman’s photo.

This 12x36" acrylic painting is a panoramic view of hole 13A (one of two "extra" holes) at the Coore&Crenshaw Lost Farm course at the Barnbougle Dunes resort on the North East shore of the Australian island of Tasmania. This links course, a neighbor to the Tom Doak-Mike Clayton Dunes course, is situated on what the Australian press calls a little bit of golfing paradise. This work is the latest in what is developing into my "Benjamin Litman Portfolio," a series of works based on Benjamin's superb photos.

This 12″ x 36″ acrylic painting is a panoramic view of hole 13A (one of two “extra” holes) at the Coore&Crenshaw Lost Farm course at the Barnbougle Dunes resort on the North East shore of the Australian island of Tasmania. This links course, a neighbor to the Tom Doak-Mike Clayton Dunes course, is situated on what the Australian press calls a little bit of golfing paradise. This work is the latest in what is developing into my “Benjamin Litman Portfolio,” a series of works based on Benjamin’s superb photos.

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Cabot Cliffs – Sixth hole. Hard along the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the one shot 6th nestles low among large dunes.

An early C.B. Macdonald "Biarritz" hole, #5, at the prestigious Fishers Island course on Long Island, NY. Painting is based on a photo taken by Jon Cavalier.

An early C.B. Macdonald “Biarritz” hole, #5, at the prestigious Fishers Island course on Long Island, NY. Painting is based on a photo taken by Jon Cavalier.

What Coore and Crenshaw have wrought upon Pinehurst #2's splendid par 3 #9 would surely bring a gleam to the eye of its creator, Donald Ross.

What Coore and Crenshaw have wrought upon Pinehurst #2’s splendid par 3 #9 would surely bring a gleam to the eye of its creator, Donald Ross.

The long, uphill dogleg right to the horizon green at #6 on Pebble Beach. The barranca on the right is good for one thing only: sparing your golf ball from a watery death in the Pacific Ocean.

The long, uphill dogleg right to the horizon green at #6 on Pebble Beach. The barranca on the right is good for one thing only: sparing your golf ball from a watery death in the Pacific Ocean.

PB7

The most scenic and electrifying par 3 in golf after #16 at Cypress Point a pitch shot down the Monterey Peninsula coast: Pebble Beach’s #7.

Essex Golf Club, in Windsor, Ontario

Essex Golf Club, in Windsor, Ontario

The sometimes drivable 330 yard 8th at Cabot bends right around a natural wetland. Rare for a hole of such modest length, the hole is bunkerless. Nonetheless, it is quite vexing!

The sometimes drivable 330 yard 8th at Cabot bends right around a natural wetland. Rare for a hole of such modest length, the hole is bunkerless. Nonetheless, it is quite vexing!

The 455 yard 16th at Cabot Links hugs the coastline but its rolling fairway makes it play much more interesting than cliff top holes cursed with flat fairways. An approach shot played with a draw will take the right to left fairway slope and feed onto the green.

The 455 yard 16th at Cabot Links hugs the coastline but its rolling fairway makes it play much more interesting than cliff top holes cursed with flat fairways. An approach shot played with a draw will take the right to left fairway slope and feed onto the green.

This panoramic view across Cabot Links shows the Gillis Mountains to the north and Margaree Island out in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Rod Whitman's low profile features do nothing to distract the eye from the glorious environment.

This panoramic view across Cabot Links shows the Gillis Mountains to the north and Margaree Island out in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Rod Whitman’s low profile features do nothing to distract the eye from the glorious environment.

“Ballyhack #5.” Long ascending fairway, strewn with large natural bunkers faced with thick grasses around the puzzle-shaped sand areas, requires a marksman’s accuracy in placing shots. Pitching and chipping severely tested by greenside mounds and bunkers.

“No. 17 at Ballyhack.” The final par 3 at Ballyhack Golf Club outside Roanoke, Virginia is a short pitch over a deep ravine to a contoured green. The hole is beautifully framed by the tall trees behind it, but shots hit short or to the right right are doomed. The trisected green requires a precise approach to the correct landing area as tee balls finding the wrong segment usually end up with bogey.

 

“St. Enodoc #16.” James Braid’s St. Enodoc course on the western coast of Cornwall, England, presents several views of the estuary leading out to the Irish Sea. The wind-swept course is often played under dramatic cloud formations.

 

“Cabot #14.” The tiny little par 3 at Cabot Links on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia would be an easy pitch if not for the ever present ocean breezes.

 

“Up 18 at Mid Pines.” One of the finest views in the entire Sandhills of North Carolina golf region. Late afternoon shadows and forward right bunker make distance control challenging.

 

“The eleventh at Legacy Golf Club.” The set of par 3s crafted by Jack Nicklaus II are among the best in the Sandhills of North Carolina. The most striking visually is #11, with a wild swamp between the elevated tee and the green 180 yards away, sitting perilously close to the lake on the right. A low to mid-iron deftly shaped from left to right is the safest play here.

For those interested in learning more about his work and perhaps purchasing or commissioning a piece, please contact Frank Giordano directly via email at warcinc@nc.rr.com.

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